Source: Phoenix Business Journal

Dr. Adrian Harvey

Neurosurgeon at Mountain Vista Medical Center

Dr. Adrian Harvey, a board-certified neurosurgeon with IASIS Healthcare’s Physician Group of Arizona, has joined the neurosurgical team at Mountain Vista Medical Center in Mesa.

Dr. Adrian Harvey

Source: ABC-15’s Morning Show

Source: ABC-15’s Midday Show

 

Source: MyNewsMesa.com

Dr. Adrian Harvey, a board-certified neurosurgeon with IASIS Healthcare’s Physician Group of Arizona, has joined the neurosurgical team at Mountain Vista Medical Center in Mesa. (Special to MyNewsMesa.com)

Dr. Adrian Harvey, a board-certified neurosurgeon with IASIS Healthcare’s Physician Group of Arizona, has joined the neurosurgical team at Mountain Vista Medical Center in Mesa. This expands the neurosurgical offerings available, enabling East Valley patients to receive complex treatments close to home.

“Dr. Harvey’s ability to offer the latest surgical technologies for the spine and brain make him a valuable addition to our team at Mountain Vista Medical Center,” said Eric Paul, market president of IASIS Healthcare in Arizona. “He will be here to help patients address disorders of the brain, spine and peripheral nerves, and enhance our trauma and stroke programs.”

Harvey is an Arizona native who graduated from Brigham Young University with a bachelor’s degree. He then graduated from Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine at Midwestern University in 2006. Following that, he spent six years in Bloomington, Ill., for residency training in neurosurgery. As part of his residency, he completed a six-month complex spine fellowship at the University of Illinois–Peoria. After finishing his residency, Harvey completed a one-year fellowship in neurosurgical oncology at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He practiced at Maricopa Medical Center and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center before forming East Valley Brain and Spine Specialists and joining the staff at Mountain Vista Medical Center.

In addition to practicing medicine, Harvey is a major in the United States Army Reserve Medical Corps.

To learn more about Harvey, the neurosurgical practice at Mountain Vista Medical Center, or the 178-bed hospital’s full scope of health care offerings, new patients can call 480-257-2702.

Mountain Vista Medical Center, part of IASIS Healthcare, is a 178-bed, full-service hospital, featuring all-private rooms and advanced medical technology. Designed to provide comprehensive health care services for residents of the East Valley, the hospital is an accredited Chest Pain Center, Primary Stroke Center, Cardiac Receiving Center and a Level III Trauma Center.

Mountain Vista Medical Center is located at 1301 S. Crismon Road in Mesa. For more information, visit mvmedicalcenter.com or call 1-877-924-WELL (9355).

Dr. Adrian Harvey, a board-certified neurosurgeon with IASIS Healthcare’s Physician Group of Arizona, has joined the neurosurgical team at Mountain Vista Medical Center in Mesa. This expands the neurosurgical offerings available, enabling East Valley patients to receive complex treatments close to home.

“Dr. Harvey’s ability to offer the latest surgical technologies for the spine and brain make him a valuable addition to our team at Mountain Vista Medical Center,” said Eric Paul, Market President of IASIS Healthcare in Arizona. “He will be here to help patients address disorders of the brain, spine and peripheral nerves, and enhance our trauma and stroke programs.”

Dr. Harvey is an Arizona native who graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelor of Science degree. He then graduated from Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine at Midwestern University in 2006. Following that, he spent six years in Bloomington, Ill., for residency training in neurosurgery. As part of his residency, he completed a six-month complex spine fellowship at the University of Illinois – Peoria. After finishing his residency, Dr. Harvey completed a one-year fellowship in neurosurgical oncology at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He practiced at Maricopa Medical Center and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center before forming East Valley Brain and Spine Specialists and joining the staff at Mountain Vista Medical Center.

In addition to practicing medicine, Dr. Harvey is a Major in the United States Army Reserve Medical Corps. He is an avid long-distance runner, triathlon participant, golfer, skier and tennis player. Dr. Harvey speaks Finnish (after living in Finland for two years) and some Spanish.

To learn more about Dr. Harvey, the neurosurgical practice at Mountain Vista Medical Center, or the 178-bed hospital’s full scope of health care offerings, new patients can call 480-257-2702.

Source: Phoenix Magazine’s “Top Docs” April 2017 issue

Arizona doctors say continuing education on drug addiction is welcome, but there’s a lot more to be done to combat opioids.

Growing Pains

Written by Lauren Loftus 
Alternatives to Opioids
• Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation: The Axium™ Neurostimulator System is a new FDA-approved device that stimulates the DRG (a spinal structure densely populated with sensory nerves), providing pain relief to targeted areas of the body.
• Endomorphins: Tulane University researchers are developing a new painkiller that targets the same pain-relieving opioid receptor as morphine but is not addictive.
• Marijuana: A Harvard-led review of studies on the use of cannabinoids by pain patients found significant improvement in symptoms.
• Psychotherapy: Therapies including Cognitive Behavior Therapy work to improve quality of life and build coping mechanisms so pain becomes more tolerable.

In his annual State of the State address in January, Governor Doug Ducey announced he had sent a letter to the Arizona Medical Board and Arizona Board of Osteopathic Examiners recommending that doctors complete Continuing Medical Education (CME) in drug addiction to combat rampant opioid abuse. Many Phoenix-area doctors say this one-hour course (as part of the 40 CME hours required every two years) will be a step in the right direction, albeit a small one, for physicians to better address addiction and the slippery slope of over-reliance on prescription pain pills. The bigger issue, some say, is how we address pain in the first place.

“We created a culture where people have the impression that they should have no pain, because that’s what we told people for a long time,” says Dr. Bentley Bobrow, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and chief medical officer of
ThePainProject.com. Over the last decade or so, he says, “we tried to treat every single kind of pain, and we over-treated it. And we inadvertently helped people become dependent on medication and surgeries.”

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, on average, one person dies every day in the state from an overdose of prescription pain relievers – opioids such as Oxycodone and Vicodin that, like heroin, work by attaching to receptors in the brain and blocking the experience of pain. These pills are prescribed for all types of ailments, Bobrow says, often appropriately for acute pain associated with surgical recovery, broken bones, etc., but also for chronic pain that may not have a direct diagnosis. “When you see a doctor and do the tests and they don’t find anything wrong with your back or knee… then they give you a prescription,” he says.

Despite their potency and potential for abuse, many doctors receive little to no formal training on how to properly prescribe these drugs. Dr. Frank LoVecchio, an emergency medicine specialist at Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, says he had “almost none” and points out that many medical schools have only started incorporating education on addiction and opioids into curriculums in the last year.

Another issue is over-prescribing. Dr. Eric Feldman, an interventional spine physician with The CORE Institute in Phoenix, says though the vast majority of doctors have good intentions, many prescribe way too many opioid pills to patients who have had routine procedures or surgeries: “Instead of giving them 14 Percocets, they give [patients] 50… you take five after [surgery] and now you have 45 [pills] in your medicine cabinet.”

Dr. Minesh Zaveri, medical director at St. Luke’s Medical Center, says Ducey’s executive action to get physicians trained is a good start, but “we still need to address underlying issues.” Pain – especially chronic pain – is not easily fixable, he says, so it follows that pain pills aren’t a magic fix. “Society wants relief right away, but what is the source of why you’re having a problem?” he asks.

Dr. Bobrow says medical training needs to shift from the biomedical model – “what you can see, what you can quantify” – to the biopsychosocial – biological factors in addition to psychological and social factors. “All of these things together are what form our experience of pain,” he says.

Addressing pain will require a better grasp on addiction, Bobrow says, but it will also require a deeper understanding of mental health and societal trends. That’s a tall order, and one that seems impossible to cover fully in Ducey’s order for a one-hour course. “We’re trying to fish people out of the river when they’re floating by when they’re addicted,” Bobrow says. “What we really need to do is go upstream and figure out why people are falling into the river in the first place.”

Click here to read print edition: PhoenixMagazine_April2017_Zaveri

Source: Arizona Silver Belt

Listen to Dr. Heuser’s interview with KTAR-92.3 FM Radio here:

St. Luke’s Medical Center, the first hospital in Arizona to offer a same-day coronary angioplasty through the radial artery in the wrist, is reporting significantly improved outcomes and cost savings for patients and the health system using the new artery access point. As a result, the less-invasive procedure is attracting national attention.

According to a national study from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, radial access could save hospitals across the U.S. more than $300 million each year due to the ability it gives hospitals and patients to have same-day surgical procedures.

St. Luke’s Medical Center is still one of few hospitals in the U.S. performing same-day cardiac catheterization using the radial artery as a standard practice. The endovascular procedure, which improves blood flow to the heart, is typically performed using the femoral artery in the groin as the more common point of access to diagnose and treat arterial diseases, including coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease.

A growing number of hospitals across the nation are now rethinking how they approach cardiac catheterization, as the new artery access point has shown a marked difference in the recovery time, pain level, reduction in complications and overall better short- and long-term outcomes for patients.

“St. Luke’s Medical Center has one of the most unique catheterization labs in the state, which has allowed us to get ahead of the curve in offering a better patient experience with better patient outcomes,” said Dr. Richard Heuser, Chief of Cardiology at St. Luke’s Medical Center, who started conducting radial access catheterization in 1993. “As a result, both patients and the health care system are enjoying significant cost savings. Since we began offering the procedure in 2010, the hospital has seen upwards of $750,000 in annual health care savings.”

Dr. Heuser, a trailblazer in cardiology, identified the potential benefits early on and was among the first wave of cardiologists in the nation to begin using this innovative procedure. According to Heuser, the radial approach reduces complications by 80 percent compared to the femoral approach.

“Although we’re using more technologically-advanced catheters and equipment, the fact that we can offer a less- invasive procedure by going through the wrist means we can keep patients out of the hospital, reduce potential complications, and help them get on with their lives, all of which saves money for them and the health care system as a whole,” said Heuser.

Linda Sortor, one of Dr. Heuser’s patients, has already experienced the benefits. She considers her ability to walk out of the hospital on the same day of her procedure, with no external evidence of her surgery other than a small Band-Aid on her wrist, as a significant triumph. “I was back to normal the next day,” she said.

Cardiac catheterization is performed in more than 1 million U.S. patients a year in order to detect blockages in arteries and deploy stents to vessels that provide blood to the heart, particularly in patients with peripheral vascular disease and obesity. The American Heart Association estimates that 82 million American adults are living with some type of heart or vascular disease.

In the traditional approach, the cardiologist begins the procedure by inserting a catheter through the femoral artery in the groin. The catheter is then directed through the artery to the heart, where the cardiologist completes the procedure. Approaching through the femoral artery requires working through layers of muscle, which can increase the trauma to the patient’s body. Typically, patients are required to remain hospitalized overnight and must lie flat for several hours to prevent bleeding following the procedure. Because the femoral artery is large, if the resulting wound from the procedure accidentally opens up during the healing process, it can cause significant bleeding requiring medical intervention.

In the radial approach, the cardiologist inserts the catheter through the radial artery, a much smaller artery in the patient’s wrist. This artery is located close to the surface of the skin resulting in less trauma to the body during insertion. Because the radial artery is smaller and located in the wrist, it responds quickly to simple pressure. The technique has been associated with a fourfold reduction in major bleeding. Additionally, using the radial approach enables most patients to immediately get out of bed and move around following the procedure, which provides them greater comfort and a faster recovery period.

St. Luke’s Medical Center has a long history of innovation. It was the first hospital in Arizona to open a cardiac catheterization lab, and the first in the Valley to perform open heart surgery. St. Luke’s Medical Center is now one of only two hospitals in the state using radial access as its primary practice.

We often attribute aches and pains to simply getting older. But here’s the truth: Life shouldn’t be painful no matter what age you are.

As part of its dedication to making a difference in the lives of its patients and communities, St. Luke’s Medical Center, along with Hedley Orthopaedic Institute and Arizona Institute of Footcare Physicians, members of IASIS Healthcare, is offering the general public a free, interactive joint health seminar from 9 a.m. to noon March 4 at The Wigwam, 300 E. Wigwam Blvd., Litchfield Park..

IASIS Healthcare is the official healthcare partner of the Phoenix Suns and Phoenix Mercury.

Attendees will hear from physicians from Hedley Orthopaedic Institute and the Arizona Institute of Footcare Physicians about all aspects of hip, shoulder, knee and foot health.

Also available for demonstration is the NAVIO robot, which will showcase an innovative new surgical system for partial knee replacement, along with another demonstration available by MAKOplasty, a minimally invasive treatment option for adults living with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis.

Seminar sessions will share different approaches to keeping joints healthy, the latest on arthritis and options for treatment, including joint replacement procedures, robotic innovations, regenerative medicine and more. The event closes with a physician panel, giving attendees the opportunity to ask questions about joint health.

As a special treat, attendees will be welcomed by the Phoenix Suns Gorilla and cheerleaders, before enjoying a free FootMaxx Gait Analysis and breakfast. Registration is encouraged as space is limited; call 877-351-9355, or visit stlukesmedcenter.com.

 Source: Glendale Star